Regions

Selwyn back on top in 2012 BERL Regional Rankings Report

Monday March 11, 2013 Jason Leung-Wai

Selwyn has regained the coveted title as the best performing local authority in 2012.  The position was held by Buller in 2011.  Selwyn faced tough competition from near neighbours Ashburton, Waimakariri, Queenstown Lakes and Waimate, who rounded out the top five.

 

At a regional level, top spot stayed with Auckland for the second year running, which held on against an improving Taranaki and a surging Southland and Waikato.  Otago rounded out the top five.

Across cities, New Plymouth improved one spot to take first place, ahead of an improving Timaru and Auckland.  Wellington City gained five places to finish 4th, and Hamilton rounded out the top five retaining 5th spot.

 

 

About BERL Regional Rankings Report

 

The BERL Regional Rankings Report is prepared annually and is based on performance across five outcome based indicators.  Four indicators - Population, employment, GDP and business units are measured over the latest year and for the last five years.  The fifth indicator is the relative openness index, which identifies the areas share of export focused activity.  The relative performance across all of these indicators determines the ranking for each area.

 

It is important to note that this is a ranking report.  It is based on the change in activity in an area relative to changes in other areas.  It is therefore looking at rate of change rather than the actual quantum of activity.  The overall rankings provide government, industry and the public with an understanding of the relative performance of New Zealand’s districts, regions and cities.

 

We stress that this report provides a high-level analysis showing how local authorities, regions and cities compare relative to each other.  For effective interventions and targeted regional economic development activity a much more detailed level of analysis is required that looks at the absolute values and quantum of change rather than relative differences between councils.  That is, more detailed information should be obtained and assessed to inform, identify and support regional economic development activity.

 

A copy of the report can be downloaded here